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https://www.gofundme.com/fostercarekidsneedlovetoo407 Good morning Foster Care Kids Need Love Too Family! Hello, I’m reaching out today because I have a favor to ask you. I am hoping you’ll join me by showing support for this amazing fundraiser, Foster Care Kids Need Love Too Events. It is really easy to give. read all about the fundraiser and leave a gift. Thanks for taking the time to read about this cause, as always, I appreciate your support. Yours, Foster Care Kids Need Love Too” #charity #donate #donations #monetary #support #worldwide #tallahassee #tally #orlando #focus #determine #tcc #famu #fsu #ucf #usf #nonprofit #organization #Nowthetruth #Facts #Research #reachingout #family

2017 BIG CHANGES WE NEED YOUR HELP!

Watch OUR VIDEO! Let’s help our children of this nation.

Foster Kids Need Love Too® is an organization that has the best interest of foster kids of this nation at their heart. As a nation, we obsess over the bringing up of our children. We make sure to provide them with the best quality of education for their mental growth; we provide the best food to our children to give them a healthy lifestyle; we provide them with the best medical facilities; and all this very rightly so, they are our children after all who will take the mantle of running this nation tomorrow, all this is their right and all of this will be provided by any parent worth their salt.

But take a moment here and consider those children who are the same age as your very own kids. Unfortunately for them there is no way to get all the best treatment in the world because they do not have any family that takes care of them and because they are all alone on this planet.

Think of the consequences for such a child. Lost in the world, they could end up on the wrong paths of criminality or abuse. If they make to a mature age, with their past marred with trouble and nothing good, they could end up in a lifelong destructing cycle of crime, of substance abuse and even of violence.

Think for a moment that just because they did not have a person in their life to guide them, these young minds which could have been put to great use of the civilization have gone rotten at the cruel hands of the unforgiving society.

That kid could have been you.   MAKE SURE YOU DONATE NOW!

If not for that person who was there for you when you needed them the most; the person who listened to you and gave you a hand when you found yourself seeking a way out of a mess. At Foster Kids Need Love Too® we want to be that family for the unfortunate and underprivileged kids of our nation who are out there as we speak trying to navigate through the adversities of life, in need of a person to look up to. We love foster kids and we want them to be our family. We want them to be a part of the bright future of our nation and we are determined in our quest to provide such children with food, care, education and above all, love.

Foster Kids Need Love Too® can only achieve this with your help. You can impart a child with a once in a life time fighting chance to turn their life around for better. Don’t you want to be the person to change a child’s future for the good? Don’t you want to be the person to hold the hand of one young child that may not be your own but will reply to your generosity with the impartial love of a child?

Foster Kids Need Love Too® will continue down this path of empathy and love and with your help, we can keep on ‘Drawing Success’.    MAKE SURE YOU DONATE NOW!

“SANTA” delivers holiday cheer to 300 kids in foster care

 

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MURRAY, Utah – Some foster children in Utah won’t have to go without this holiday season, thanks to airmen from Hill Air Force Base and athletes from the University of Utah.

They’re part of Utah Foster Care’s Santa’s Brigade. Their mission is to make the holidays a little brighter for kids who are trying to adjust to a new home.

Santa’s Brigade spread holiday cheer to 300 kids in foster care in Northern Utah as University of Utah athletes delivered Christmas trees and decorations.

“Everything was donated, so all it takes is manpower,” said Stevenson Sylvester, former Pittsburgh Steeler & U of U football player. “Just to see their excitement today when we deliver these trees is just going to be epic.”

Airmen from the 419th and 388th showered kids with nearly 800 gifts.

“We’re here to bless all the families with things they don’t have or more that they need,” said Tech Sgt. Neysa Henson.

The volunteers use their own vacation time to be part of this special day.

“I am so humbled that they take time out of their schedules, they use their personal resources, they take personal leave to come make a difference in the lives of these kids,” said Karrie Scott, a foster parent.

Scott has adopted six children from foster care.

“Sometimes the families have made bad choices,” she said. “The parents are struggling with something, but that’s not the kids’ fault.”

To see their faces light up during a challenging time is the best gift she could ask for.

“Everybody deserves a home, everybody deserves to be loved,” she said.

For more information about ways to donate to Utah Foster Care, click here.

Texas has spent over $7 million fighting foster care lawsuit

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AUSTIN — Texas has spent more than $7 million fighting a class-action lawsuit over its troubled foster care system.

Since 2011, three state agencies have spent nearly $6.6 million in lawyers’ and other state staff members’ time and on travel, transcription services and other expenses related to the federal suit, according to data obtained by The Dallas Morning News under Texas’ open records law.

Additionally, the Department of Family and Protective Services has been forced to pay $650,000 for salary and travel expenses of the two experts appointed by the court to come up with a reform plan.

Last December, U.S. District Judge Janis Graham Jack declared Texas’ foster care system unconstitutionally flawed and ordered the independent overhaul. The lawsuit was filed in 2011 by the New York-based advocacy group Children’s Rights and multiple Texas law firms.

Some child advocates and lawyers who brought the suit on behalf of 12,000 children in long-term foster care find Texas’ resistance disheartening.

“We’d like to see state leaders quickly put the legal battles in the rearview mirror and focus on helping kids,” said Kate Murphy of Texans Care for Children.

Paul Yetter of Houston, who was the plaintiffs’ lead lawyer at trial, said, “Given that innocent children’s lives are at stake, the state should be focused on fixing its broken system, not spending millions to defend it.”

Spokesmen for Gov. Greg Abbott and Attorney General Ken Paxton insist the legal costs were necessary. They say that only the state itself, free of judicial interference, can fix Texas’ foster care system, which state officials have acknowledged needs work.

Paxton spokesman Marc Rylander said that “if the plaintiffs complain about wasting resources on defending against its lawsuit, they should drop their lawsuit and stop using Texas children as hostages for their policy negotiation.'”

Judge Jack’s final order in the case could come in a few months and she could effectively order the state to spend tens of millions a year on new initiatives. Paxton appears all but certain to appeal the final order.

How Demetrius Jackson went from foster care to the NBA

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SOUTH BEND, Ind. (WNDU) — Demetrius Jackson, a junior and star point guard at the University of Notre Dame announced he would be leaving school immediately to prepare for the NBA Draft Combine in May. He will sign with an agent in the coming weeks in hopes of becoming a first round lottery pick in the NBA Draft in June.

Jackson was a star athlete at Marian High School, and decided to stay in the area to play for Coach Mike Brey at the University of Notre Dame. In three seasons, he’s helped change the culture of the Irish basketball program, leading Notre Dame to the Elite 8 each of the last two seasons.

“When I was in high school, people would talk about how Notre Dame would lose in the first round every year and things like that, but people don’t say that about us anymore,” Jackson said Wednesday.

Now, Demetrius is ready for the next challenge in life and that’s the NBA.

“A dream come true, and it’s been my goal for such a long time. So to be able to have the opportunity to kind of reach that goal; [it’s] just an amazing feeling,” said Jackson.

On the verge of reaching the NBA, what would a young Demetrius be thinking right now? He said the, “10-year-old me would probably be crying back there somewhere, just kind of happy, tears of joy.”

That’s because Demetrius didn’t have it easy growing up. He was in the foster care system when he found the Whitfield family of Mishawaka, Indiana, who took him into their home.

“Without them, I wouldn’t be here, so they gave me an opportunity,” Jackson said of the Whitfield family. “They gave me a home. They gave me love. Without my family, I wouldn’t be here today.”

Jackson was a member of the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU), and was a teammate of the Whitfield’s oldest child, Michael. He was the one to ask his parents, Dave and Beth, if Demetrius could live with them. The family, already with five kids of their own, felt it was the right thing to do.

“As a foster kid, going through different foster homes, trust is definitely something that’s difficult. So coming into a home where I was able to just be myself, be comfortable and be loved by a great family just definitely helped me gain trust,” Jackson said. “Ultimately, that allowed me to open up to them and to my teammates and to my coaches and be more open with everybody and just be at ease with my situation.”

In February 2016, his high school Marion, honored the young athlete, and the city of Mishawaka declared it “Demetrius Jackson Day”. The gesture caused Jackson to break down in tears.

“I don’t even know how to put into words how special it was,” Jackson said after receiving the key to the city on that February day. “I don’t cry very often. Just shed tears and happiness with my family and my community to make them proud.”

He continued, “It means so much to just kind of represent the whole [area] and just be able to just be a role model for some of the young kids growing up in the area. It’s been such a blessing to go to such a great university and just have some of the teammates I had and have some of the people in my life I’ve had. Just definitely a great blessing for me.”

Jackson hopes he can inspire others in a similar situation as him.

“It would just give kids in this area the confidence that they can make it too; give kids in the area the confidence to know that if they work hard, that they’ll be able to reach their dreams, as well,” Jackson said. “It would just be really special. I’m just really thankful because I had a great situation. I was placed, I went to a great high school, a great university, so it was really set up for me to just be where I am today, and I’m just really thankful for that.”

And while Demetrius will leave his hometown for the first time, he says he’s not leaving it for good. “This is my home,” Jackson said. “My home is 15 minutes away and Notre Dame is my home; so I’ll always be here.”

This IS Our Problem: Fixing Foster Care in America, My Part (And Yours)

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Last night it was bitterly cold. The heat in our office building hadn’t been working so the staff and I worked most of the day with our coats and hats on. We thought the conditions were impossible, brutal, unbearable. We complained to management. We complained to each other. And then, just as I was about to head home to a delicious meal with my family, my cell phone rang and I was suddenly reminded that even the worst conditions I have ever faced are the best conditions some children can imagine.

It was a social service worker, a friend of mine, calling to ask if I could wait a bit longer for a group of caseworkers to come to our facility. They had just abruptly removed 4 children from deplorable conditions. Their mother was nowhere to be found. The kids needed pretty much everything; from clothing to shoes to comfort items. Of course, I agreed to wait.

In situations like these, it’s the waiting that is sometimes the hardest part. I wonder what I’m about to see. I wonder how bad it will be. I wonder if these children will be crying. I wonder if they will be scared. I wonder if I will be able to hold it together so I don’t make them feel even worse.

I opened the door twenty minutes later to three caseworkers. One was carrying a baby. One was carrying a toddler who was not wearing any shoes or socks. The other 2 children walked in on their own; 5 and 7 years old. Immediately, the 7 year old made eye contact with me and I could see she had been crying. She looked up at me and almost began to cry again.

I knelt down and took her hand and told her my name. Then I asked hers and she whispered it softly. Then I asked her if she would like to go look at some toys. Immediately, her face changed. She smiled a bit. “Yes!”

Over the next hour and half the caseworkers and I split our time between walking the children through our toy closet, helping them choose their favorites, and attempting to find enough clothing in the right sizes to get the children prepared for their first night away from home.

Beneath her dirty clothing, the baby was covered in feces. It took two workers to clean her up. One of the men came out and sat down, head in his hands, and said “How can people do this?” For me it’s always so hard to see that type of raw, vulnerable emotion, especially from a big, strong, tough-looking guy. I didn’t know what to say to him.

When the group was ready to leave, the 7 year-old girl turned back and gave me a hug. I held her as tightly as I could. I wanted to take her home.

It was then I started to think about my own kids; 7 and 8 years old. Their biggest worry of the day was doing homework. They were waiting at home for me with their amazing, attentive, super supportive dad. They were playing games in their playroom. I didn’t feel guilty for this joyful loving home I have. But I did feel like I wanted to get back to sharing it.

So I will. I am hopeful that in the coming months my home will be reopened to accept foster children like the four amazing kids I met last night. That is the part I want to play in this solution.

But that may not be your reaction and that is totally OK! There are dozens of ways that you can also do something super amazing to ensure these beautiful, innocent children get the love and support and hope they need. Because they need all of us in on this.

To be honest, I don’t even care why you decide to help. Just do something other than read this, feel bad and go on with your day. Do it to be a good example for your kids. Do it to better your community. Do it because you can…because you had a loving family, or you didn’t have a family at all, but you are here and healthy and able. Do it because if you don’t, who will?

Let’s just all come together and loudly and proudly make a commitment that we will be one part of the very big village we know it takes to raise a healthy, happy child.

Below are some of my favorite ways to get involved but I want to hear more. Join me in using #MyPartOurVillage and tag @OneSimpleWish on Twitter.

Here are 5 ways to get started in doing YOUR part:

1. Grant a wish!
It’s a simple, direct and beautiful way to share some joy with a child impacted by foster care and abuse and neglect.
2. Consider becoming a CASA.
Court Appointed Special Advocates are amazingly dedicated volunteers who act as a voice for a child in court and are a stable source of support for kids who need it.
3. Read Foster Focus Magazine
Learn more about what is going on with foster care in America and the inspiring kids and adults who are working hard to fix it.
4. Consider becoming a Foster Parent.
All you need to know is here. And you can email me too!
5. Tweet about other foster care or children’s rights organizations that you support. Tell us what you do and how to do it. Don’t forget to use #MyPartOurVillage and tag@OneSimpleWish so we can share your ideas!

Please remember that whatever you choose to do, one way or the other, it will matter.

Follow Foster Care Kids Need Love Too on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FosterLoveToo

Support KONTENT of KHARACTER

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Good afternoon Foster Care Kids Need Love Too family! We are NOW partners with Kontent of Kharacter for each shirt the company  sales, they will donate %10 percent proceedings to our organization. We need your love and support to establish this monetary investment to our organization.  PURCHASE your SHIRT & HOODIES at https://teespring.com/kontentofkharacter “Together We Can Make A Change” HAPPY NEW YEAR! WE LOVE YOU…

Why Was Foster Care Kids Need Love Too Created?

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Foster Kids Need Love Too® is an organization that has the best interest of foster kids of this nation at their heart. As a nation we obsess over the bringing up of our children. We make sure to provide them with the best quality of education for their mental growth; we provide the best food to our children to give them a healthy lifestyle; we provide them with the best medical facilities; and all this very rightly so, they are our children after all who will take the mantel of running this nation tomorrow, all this is their right and all of this will be provided by any parent worth their salt.

But take a moment here and consider those children who are the same age as your very own kids. Unfortunately for them there is no way to get all the best treatment in the world because they do not have any family that takes care of them and because they are all alone on this planet.

Think of the consequences for such a child. Lost in the world, they could end up on the wrong paths of criminality or abuse. If they make to a mature age, with their past marred with trouble and nothing good, they could end up in a lifelong destructing cycle of crime, of substance abuse and even of violence.

Think for a moment that just because they did not have a person in their life to guide them, these young minds which could have been put to great use of the civilization have gone rotten at the cruel hands of the unforgiving society.

That kid could have been you.

If not for that person who was there for you when you needed them the most; the person who listened to you and gave you a hand when you found yourself seeking a way out of a mess. At Foster Kids Need Love Too® we want to be that family for the unfortunate and underprivileged kids of our nation who are out there as we speak trying to navigate through the adversities of life, in need of person to look up to. We love foster kids and we want them to be our family. We want them to be a part of the bright future of our nation and we are determined in our quest to provide such children with food, care, education and above all, love.

Foster Kids Need Love Too® can only achieve this with your help. You can impart a child with a once in a life time fighting chance to turn their life around for better. Don’t you want to be the person to change a child’s future for the good? Don’t you want to be the person to hold the hand of one young child that may not be your own but will reply to your generosity with the impartial love of a child?

Foster Kids Need Love Too® will continue down this path of empathy and love and with your help we can keep on ‘Drawing Success’. Also make sure to get your inspirational gear to support Foster Care Kids Need Love Too NOW GET YOURS TODAY! at : Buy Yours Today! Support This Important Movement

Young Girls In State Care To Get Transitional Home

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Construction is slated to begin soon on the Caribbean’s first independent living complex for wards of the State, following Friday’s official groundbreaking ceremony at 24 Lady Musgrave Drive, New Kingston.

Upon completion, the facility will be equipped to house at lease 40 young women who have reached the age of 18, when, by law, they are required to leave their places of safety, irrespective of whether they have a job or place to live.

Under the Transitional Living Program for Children in State Care, these young women will spend up to two additional years in the care of the state.

Dr Luz Longsworth, principal of the Open Campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI), used the groundbreaking ceremony to announce the gift of 30 one-year scholarships to the pioneer residents of the complex. Another 15 such scholarships will be provided to young men, also wards of the state, at the tertiary level as well.

Luis Moreno, United States ambassador to Jamaica, gave a commitment that his country would fund a similar facility for young men, to be built in Manning, St Elizabeth. The United States Agency for International Development is funding the Kingston facility at a cost of US$1.45 million under the Development Grants Program, in what Youth and Culture Minister Lisa Hanna described as a game-changing partnership.

With the Jamaican Government donating prime land space in New Kingston’s ‘Golden Triangle’, the project will be implemented through the collaborative efforts of the Caribbean Child Development Centre, Child Development Agency, the Social Welfare Centre, and the UWI Project Management Office.

Meanwhile, Rosalee Gage-Grey, chief executive officer of the Child Development Agency, spoke to the importance of this intervention.

VERY SIGNIFICANT

“It is very significant because we have about 700 children that leave care each year. Some of them are in foster care, and the foster parents will continue to keep them; some can be reintegrated with their own families. We have some who come into Kingston for tertiary education and need a place, and so it will provide a space where they can move from university to work for the period of the two years, and so its very significant,” she told The Gleaner.

“And it’s semi-independent, meaning that they will take care of themselves, with some support. So they will be comfortable with individualized spaces, and we will continue to provide the support, the life skills for them to transition successfully.”

A clearly excited Hanna gave this response when asked to gauge the significance of the new facility.

On a scale of 1-10?

“Eleven!” she answered, noting that it will address an area of need that has been neglected for too long.

“It’s a long time in the making, and its something that I’m very pleased with; conceptualized it, UWI came on board, USAID came on board, and now they’ve said to us, we are going to be working on the contract for the one for the boys in St Elizabeth. We gave the land, UWI is giving the social work and the training, USAID is putting up the money, so there is a lot of equity going into this,” she added.

However, the youth minister would not commit to the completion timeline for the Kingston facility or the start-up for the one slated for St Elizabeth.

To support our mission, organization, and cause please send your monetary donations at: http://goo.gl/YNNqg4

Church hopes to match kids with foster families

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WAYNESBORO — Sonya Payne remembers her best birthday ever.

It was in 2010, the day she legally adopted her foster daughter Ariel Simone Payne, 16.

Ariel wasn’t the first child that Payne has fostered. In fact, Payne estimates that she’s legally fostered 40 children since 1993, and taken in over 70, even if only temporarily.

“That’s why we call her superwoman,” said Ariel’s adoptive sister Taimonique Payne, 15 and a half years old.

Payne decided to become a foster parent while working with battered women, and seeing the effect it had on both the women and children.

“It was too much,” Payne said. “I told my husband, we have to do something to help these kids.”

She read about her first foster child in the newspaper in 1993 and the rest is history.

Even with families like the Paynes, there are still local children in the foster care system that do not currently have homes and are at risk of aging out of the system, which severely affects their chances of success once they become adults, said Jennifer Eccles, foster parent and member of the mission team at First Baptist Church in Waynesboro. There are 163 kids in foster homes locally, but 14 that don’t have somewhere to call home.

That’s why the church decided to hold a summit about foster care, with a panel of foster care workers, parents and adopted teenagers, to inform the community about the need for more participation in the foster care system.

The summit was Sunday afternoon and about 25 people attended, Eccles said.

“The church feels very strongly that we have a calling to help these kids in our community,” said the mom of six. “They need families.”

One of the main focuses of the summit was on the need for care for older children and children with siblings, specifically, Eccles said. Removing the stigma that older children come with more problems is key.

“This is not about bad behavior,” Eccles said of why children end up in the foster care system. “It’s because of abuse or neglect.”

Both Ariel and Taimonique spoke about being adopted and what they would tell other foster parents if they could.

“Never give up on your adopted kids,” Taimonique said. They may have difficult behavior and difficulty adjusting, but never to give up.

For more information about foster parenting call Jennifer Edson or Heather Hudnall at Shenandoah Valley Social Services at 540-245-5800.

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