Tag Archives: National Foster Care Awareness Month

Welcome Holidays Memories

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Good morning family! As we approach the holidays it is known this is one of the most stressful times of the year. The most depressive and when the most suicides are committed. I hope this post reaches you well and that you can think of someone that does this for you or use it as a tool to do onto others. Tag someone that you can lean on or share the appreciation with them. Spread the love and enjoy the time you have. #FosterCare #Adoption #Donate #Donations #Charity #Support #Love #Repost #Awareness #Holidays #HappyHolidays #Thanksgiving #Christmas #Tag #likes4likes

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Support Us To Make A Change!

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https://www.gofundme.com/fostercarekidsneedlovetoo407 Good morning Foster Care Kids Need Love Too Family! Hello, I’m reaching out today because I have a favor to ask you. I am hoping you’ll join me by showing support for this amazing fundraiser, Foster Care Kids Need Love Too Events. It is really easy to give. read all about the fundraiser and leave a gift. Thanks for taking the time to read about this cause, as always, I appreciate your support. Yours, Foster Care Kids Need Love Too” #charity #donate #donations #monetary #support #worldwide #tallahassee #tally #orlando #focus #determine #tcc #famu #fsu #ucf #usf #nonprofit #organization #Nowthetruth #Facts #Research #reachingout #family

Support KONTENT of KHARACTER

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Good afternoon Foster Care Kids Need Love Too family! We are NOW partners with Kontent of Kharacter for each shirt the company  sales, they will donate %10 percent proceedings to our organization. We need your love and support to establish this monetary investment to our organization.  PURCHASE your SHIRT & HOODIES at https://teespring.com/kontentofkharacter “Together We Can Make A Change” HAPPY NEW YEAR! WE LOVE YOU…

Why Was Foster Care Kids Need Love Too Created?

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Foster Kids Need Love Too® is an organization that has the best interest of foster kids of this nation at their heart. As a nation we obsess over the bringing up of our children. We make sure to provide them with the best quality of education for their mental growth; we provide the best food to our children to give them a healthy lifestyle; we provide them with the best medical facilities; and all this very rightly so, they are our children after all who will take the mantel of running this nation tomorrow, all this is their right and all of this will be provided by any parent worth their salt.

But take a moment here and consider those children who are the same age as your very own kids. Unfortunately for them there is no way to get all the best treatment in the world because they do not have any family that takes care of them and because they are all alone on this planet.

Think of the consequences for such a child. Lost in the world, they could end up on the wrong paths of criminality or abuse. If they make to a mature age, with their past marred with trouble and nothing good, they could end up in a lifelong destructing cycle of crime, of substance abuse and even of violence.

Think for a moment that just because they did not have a person in their life to guide them, these young minds which could have been put to great use of the civilization have gone rotten at the cruel hands of the unforgiving society.

That kid could have been you.

If not for that person who was there for you when you needed them the most; the person who listened to you and gave you a hand when you found yourself seeking a way out of a mess. At Foster Kids Need Love Too® we want to be that family for the unfortunate and underprivileged kids of our nation who are out there as we speak trying to navigate through the adversities of life, in need of person to look up to. We love foster kids and we want them to be our family. We want them to be a part of the bright future of our nation and we are determined in our quest to provide such children with food, care, education and above all, love.

Foster Kids Need Love Too® can only achieve this with your help. You can impart a child with a once in a life time fighting chance to turn their life around for better. Don’t you want to be the person to change a child’s future for the good? Don’t you want to be the person to hold the hand of one young child that may not be your own but will reply to your generosity with the impartial love of a child?

Foster Kids Need Love Too® will continue down this path of empathy and love and with your help we can keep on ‘Drawing Success’. Also make sure to get your inspirational gear to support Foster Care Kids Need Love Too NOW GET YOURS TODAY! at : Buy Yours Today! Support This Important Movement

Young Girls In State Care To Get Transitional Home

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Construction is slated to begin soon on the Caribbean’s first independent living complex for wards of the State, following Friday’s official groundbreaking ceremony at 24 Lady Musgrave Drive, New Kingston.

Upon completion, the facility will be equipped to house at lease 40 young women who have reached the age of 18, when, by law, they are required to leave their places of safety, irrespective of whether they have a job or place to live.

Under the Transitional Living Program for Children in State Care, these young women will spend up to two additional years in the care of the state.

Dr Luz Longsworth, principal of the Open Campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI), used the groundbreaking ceremony to announce the gift of 30 one-year scholarships to the pioneer residents of the complex. Another 15 such scholarships will be provided to young men, also wards of the state, at the tertiary level as well.

Luis Moreno, United States ambassador to Jamaica, gave a commitment that his country would fund a similar facility for young men, to be built in Manning, St Elizabeth. The United States Agency for International Development is funding the Kingston facility at a cost of US$1.45 million under the Development Grants Program, in what Youth and Culture Minister Lisa Hanna described as a game-changing partnership.

With the Jamaican Government donating prime land space in New Kingston’s ‘Golden Triangle’, the project will be implemented through the collaborative efforts of the Caribbean Child Development Centre, Child Development Agency, the Social Welfare Centre, and the UWI Project Management Office.

Meanwhile, Rosalee Gage-Grey, chief executive officer of the Child Development Agency, spoke to the importance of this intervention.

VERY SIGNIFICANT

“It is very significant because we have about 700 children that leave care each year. Some of them are in foster care, and the foster parents will continue to keep them; some can be reintegrated with their own families. We have some who come into Kingston for tertiary education and need a place, and so it will provide a space where they can move from university to work for the period of the two years, and so its very significant,” she told The Gleaner.

“And it’s semi-independent, meaning that they will take care of themselves, with some support. So they will be comfortable with individualized spaces, and we will continue to provide the support, the life skills for them to transition successfully.”

A clearly excited Hanna gave this response when asked to gauge the significance of the new facility.

On a scale of 1-10?

“Eleven!” she answered, noting that it will address an area of need that has been neglected for too long.

“It’s a long time in the making, and its something that I’m very pleased with; conceptualized it, UWI came on board, USAID came on board, and now they’ve said to us, we are going to be working on the contract for the one for the boys in St Elizabeth. We gave the land, UWI is giving the social work and the training, USAID is putting up the money, so there is a lot of equity going into this,” she added.

However, the youth minister would not commit to the completion timeline for the Kingston facility or the start-up for the one slated for St Elizabeth.

To support our mission, organization, and cause please send your monetary donations at: http://goo.gl/YNNqg4

Church hopes to match kids with foster families

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WAYNESBORO — Sonya Payne remembers her best birthday ever.

It was in 2010, the day she legally adopted her foster daughter Ariel Simone Payne, 16.

Ariel wasn’t the first child that Payne has fostered. In fact, Payne estimates that she’s legally fostered 40 children since 1993, and taken in over 70, even if only temporarily.

“That’s why we call her superwoman,” said Ariel’s adoptive sister Taimonique Payne, 15 and a half years old.

Payne decided to become a foster parent while working with battered women, and seeing the effect it had on both the women and children.

“It was too much,” Payne said. “I told my husband, we have to do something to help these kids.”

She read about her first foster child in the newspaper in 1993 and the rest is history.

Even with families like the Paynes, there are still local children in the foster care system that do not currently have homes and are at risk of aging out of the system, which severely affects their chances of success once they become adults, said Jennifer Eccles, foster parent and member of the mission team at First Baptist Church in Waynesboro. There are 163 kids in foster homes locally, but 14 that don’t have somewhere to call home.

That’s why the church decided to hold a summit about foster care, with a panel of foster care workers, parents and adopted teenagers, to inform the community about the need for more participation in the foster care system.

The summit was Sunday afternoon and about 25 people attended, Eccles said.

“The church feels very strongly that we have a calling to help these kids in our community,” said the mom of six. “They need families.”

One of the main focuses of the summit was on the need for care for older children and children with siblings, specifically, Eccles said. Removing the stigma that older children come with more problems is key.

“This is not about bad behavior,” Eccles said of why children end up in the foster care system. “It’s because of abuse or neglect.”

Both Ariel and Taimonique spoke about being adopted and what they would tell other foster parents if they could.

“Never give up on your adopted kids,” Taimonique said. They may have difficult behavior and difficulty adjusting, but never to give up.

For more information about foster parenting call Jennifer Edson or Heather Hudnall at Shenandoah Valley Social Services at 540-245-5800.

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Legislature Approves Foster Care Overhaul

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The California foster care system would be overhauled under a bill passed by the state Legislature. The measure changes the focus of the foster care system in the state..

Democratic Assemblyman Mark Stone authored the bill.

“What this bill does is move the care away from congregate care, group homes, and into more individualized care,” he says.

Stone says children may still be placed in group facilities for short periods of time. But he says they would receive intensive treatment while there. A greater effort will also be made to return children to their families or find them new permanent homes.

Foster parents will also receive more training and support.

The bill includes recommendations from a 2015 Department of Social Services report on reforming the foster care system.

It is awaiting action from the governor.

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State of emergency: Shortage of foster homes leads to separated siblings, moving far from home

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Georgia is in a “state of emergency” when it comes to foster care, and Floyd County was ranked the fifth highest county per capita for children removed from their homes, according to DFCS officials and a report from Georgia Child Welfare Measures.

Some 244 children from Floyd County were sent into foster care from April 2014 through March 2015, according to the statistics.

That state rate over that time period was 31.2 children per 10,000. Floyd County’s rate was 104.5 per 10,000.

Why is the rate so high? There are several reasons, according to local officials.

“It comes down to the fact that we are looking more,” said Floyd County Juvenile Court Judge Greg Price. “We have two hospitals and many medical professionals who are required to report suspicious things. We have a high number of teachers and law enforcement as well.”

These individuals are trained to notice signs of trouble, he added.

“When you’re a mechanic trained to fix problems on VWs, when you drive down the road, you’re going to see the VWs first,” explained Price.

Another issue is cyclical abuse and neglect, according to Price and Lindsey Howerton, director of the Floyd County Division of Family and Children Services.

“We have many families who repeat the cycle of abuse and neglect,” she said. “They stay here. Their children have children, and it keeps going and no one breaks the pattern.”

The reasons for the removal of children from their homes covers a wide range, with 120 removed for neglect, 80 removed because their parents were abusing drugs or alcohol, 52 removed because parents were unable to cope, 88 removed for inadequate housing, 30 were abandoned and 32 were victims of physical abuse. Other reasons include sexual abuse, domestic violence or because parents are incarcerated.

Howerton said the specific reasons stated can be misleading.

“Many times, when we investigate further, we may find signs of physical or sexual abuse when the child was originally removed for neglect or drug abuse,” she said. “This is especially true for a younger child who is not in school. If that child is only going to the doctor once a year, it is much harder to catch.”

A major crisis situation arises after these children are removed, because Floyd County only has 16 DFCS foster homes.

“This often results in our children being placed out of county, which causes all kinds of problems,” she said. “The children have a harder time coming back for court dates and for visits with their families. Also, you have the added trauma for the child, which is just increased by them having to completely relocate and have nothing familiar around them.”

DFCS always tries to help the families, she added, and this is made more difficult when the child is miles away.

“Our main goal when a child is removed from a home is to work with the parents to help them change behaviors if possible and bring their child home,” Howerton said. “Having to place that child in a home in Macon just makes it that much harder on everyone.”

So, the first thing DFCS does is try to find a qualified family member or family friend who can take the child. This is the best option, but sometimes is impossible because they might not live in the area or may be unsuitable.

Issues also often arise because of siblings, she said.

“We have a lot of multiple-child families, and the ideal would be to have those siblings together or at least close to each other,” she said. “This becomes hard because many foster families can’t handle that many children at once.”

Floyd does have 23 homes that work with child placing agencies, such as Faith Bridge, Howerton added. However, these homes can have children who are not from Floyd County placed in them. Winshape Homes is its own entity and does work with DFCS as much as possible, she said.

“We have two large sibling groups placed with Winshape currently,” she said.

The Open Door Home is a group home and children are only placed there if they are 13 or older.

“We are always hoping that if people know there is a need, they will be willing to serve as foster families,” she said.

Potential foster families attend classes, she said. Families are taught about the process from start to finish about policies and how a child might behave.

“For instance, a child who has suffered neglect may hoard food,” she said. “I’ve had children who don’t understand or know about the bath routine and a child who had never seen a toothbrush.”

Those who want to foster are also given a home study session in which a DFCS agent comes into the home and observes the environment and the family’s interaction.

“Most understand the reasons behind this,” Howerton said. “It is all about the safety and well-being of the child. The home studies are usually completed within two or three sessions.”

Foster parents also have to undergo fingerprinting, background checks and financial checks.

“We have to make sure they can handle the extra expense,” Howerton said. “We do not so much pay as reimburse. A foster family has to be stable enough to handle extra costs like clothing, diapers and glasses, and then be reimbursed.”

Once approved, foster parents are often immediately needed.

“I’ve had families receive a child the day they were approved,” Howerton said.

About 75 percent of the 422 Floyd County children in foster care are placed outside of Floyd County, Howerton said. Of the 25 percent here, the majority are placed with family members.

These numbers frustrate Howerton, she said.

“I would love to put myself out of a job,” she said. “We are trying to build strong families in a strong community. When it comes to foster care in this county and this state, we are in a state of emergency.”

Senate approves bill boosting foster care training

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The Senate has approved mandating 35 hours of training for potential foster care parents, more than double what some are now required to have.

The proposal by Sunnyvale Republican Rep. Cindy Burkett cleared the House last month and passed the Senate without debate Tuesday. Both chambers will have to reconcile small tweaks before it goes to Gov. Greg Abbott to be signed into law.

The proposal toughens the foster-care screening process. Critics worried it could make the already-difficult recruitment of foster parents even harder, but opposition was minimal.

Texas already requires 35 training hours for state foster-care recruits, but only 16 hours for potential parents retained through private contractors.

The bill comes after 13 children died while in Child Protective Services custody in fiscal years 2013.

17,000 kids can’t play your political games

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When my partner and I decided we wanted to become parents, we had no idea the level of complexity and number of challenges that would emerge along the way. After all, we thought, why would anyone want to prevent a child from finding a stable home and a loving family?

As prospective parents, excited by the thought of expanding our family, we were surprised to learn that same-sex couples were considered bottom on the list of homes to be placed with children. We learned that many adoption agencies throughout the state acted on their right to refuse representing same-sex adoptive couples.

After finally locating an agency that treated us with dignity and respect, our dreams came true when we were introduced to two beautiful sisters who would forever change our lives and give us the new title “daddy.” Our mission since has been to raise awareness and get to the real truth of this community need.

ROBERTS: 17,000 reasons why Ducey did the right thing

MONTINI: Ducey takes stand for all adoptions, including same-sex

What often gets lost in the whirlwind of rhetoric are the 17,000 children in Arizona’s foster care system who need and deserve a loving home. This is why Equality Arizona is launching a new effort called Project Jigsaw: Connecting Every Child to a Loving Family.

The recent decision by Gov. Doug Ducey to require state agencies to allow all legally married couples in Arizona, including same-sex couples, to adopt was a huge step in the right direction. As the governor so eloquently stated, “All children deserve a loving home, and under my watch, I’m committed to making sure government encourages that.”

In order to achieve this, Arizonans need to take an “all hands on deck” approach.

First, we need to ensure that all who are involved in the adoption process have access to the resources they need. This means giving parents, providers, educators and others access to helpful information and resources about adoption so the child can succeed

Second, we need to begin educating the public about the importance of adoption and why we should never put up barriers to finding children permanent, loving homes in Arizona.

Finally, Project Jigsaw will connect with elected officials and providers to ensure that Arizona policies align with Gov. Ducey’s vision of a home for every child.

It’s time for all of Arizona’s leaders, regardless of political party, to come together and support loving families of all walks of life. While there are many in this community who can afford to play political games, the 17,000 children in Arizona’s foster care system certainly cannot.

Ultimately, the campaign is about creating an environment where all Arizonans can be lucky enough to experience what my partner and I have: building a loving family for amazing children, who need and deserve it just like every other child.

And though the individual pieces of our family may not be the same as yours, I can assure you the final picture will show the same thing: unconditional love.